Do You Speak Pansy?

15 Dec

Image of woman in gown and shawl holding an open bookIsabella Alden sometimes used terms or phrases that were common at the time, but have since gone out of use . . . and today’s readers may not have a clue what she means.

On this blog you can now easily find posts that explain some of those words and phrases. Under the Categories list on the right you’ll  see a new category for Pansy’s Dictionary. Follow the link to read blog posts that define peculiar words in Isabella’s books. Here are some of the terms we’ve already defined:

Have you come across a word or phrase in Isabella’s books that stumped you? Share it using the comment section below and we’ll define the term in future posts. You’ll be speaking fluent Pansy in no time!

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2 Responses to “Do You Speak Pansy?”

  1. Merry Chris December 17, 2014 at 6:24 am #

    I’ve learned a lot about the time in which Pansy lived by reading your posts. They really help put some context around her stories. The word that stumped me was “jockey.” Pansy used it throughout her book Jessie Wells. I assumed a jockey was a hat but, like Flossie’s pongee coat, I wonder what made this particular hat so distinctive?

    • Isabella Alden December 17, 2014 at 1:07 pm #

      You’re right, Merry Chris. Throughout the book, Isabella Alden simply said, “jockey” when she referred to Jessie’s hat. We’ll see if we can find some examples that illustrate the style of a jockey hat, and post them soon.

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