Riding the Cars

14 Aug

Street-cars traversing Thomas Circle in Washington, DC in 1907

New York City looking north on Broadway in 1910.

 

When Isabella Alden wrote about her characters “riding the cars,” she wasn’t referring to automobiles. The “cars” she wrote about were steam cars and streetcars.

Steam cars were steam-engine locomotives, which ran between cities on rails. By the late 1800s, the period when most of Isabella’s stories take place, railroad stations were springing up in small towns and running across rural areas as fast as workers could lay the rails.

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Offices of The Herald newspaper in New York City.

Like locomotives, streetcars also ran on rails, but the passenger compartments were smaller and narrower.  They were typically powered by either cable-pulley systems or electricity, but early streetcars were pulled by horses. Streetcars were common forms of in-town transportation in the early 1900s. Small, mid-size, and major cities across the country had robust street-car systems to transport riders throughout a city’s major business areas and often from one end of town to another.

Streetcars running on First Avenue, downtown Seattle.

In Twenty Minutes Late, Caroline Bryant saw her first streetcar when she arrived in Philadelphia. Her only previous experience with riding a car was a seven-hour train trip she’d taken with her mother years before. In Philadelphia, her companion led the way to the street and lifted his hand in a peculiar manner.

A man who was driving what was to Caroline the strangest-looking wagon she had ever seen, drew up his horses and the wagon came to a stand-still. It had a number of little wheels, smaller than Caroline supposed wagon wheels were ever made.

“We’ll get into this car,” he said, “and that will save us a long walk and leave us a long enough one at the other end. I often wish I lived nearer the depot, but then it wouldn’t be so nice for my children as where I am now.”

Caroline was busy with one word: “car.” But there was no engine, only two horses.

“It must be a street car.”

She had heard Miss Webster speak of them, and also Judge Dunmore, and here she was getting into one!

When Twenty Minutes Late was published in 1893, horse-drawn streetcars were the norm, but by the early 1900s, streetcars became more mechanical and horse-power was replaced by cables or electricity.

04 Butte Montana 1907

Main Street in Butte, Montana about 1907.

Smaller cities and towns had streetcars, as well. This hand-colored photo from a 1907 postcard shows a streetcar running the length of Main Street in Butte, Montana.

In Judge Burnham’s Daughters, the Judge’s young son, Erskine, was very fond of riding the cars. One Sunday the Judge offered to take the family into the city to attend church at St. Paul’s, a fashionable church where the worship music was supposed to be very fine.

10 Worcester Mass Train Station

An example of a train and streetcar station. This one is in Worcester, Massachusetts.

It would have been an easy trip. From their small town the Burnhams would have ridden a steam car into the city. Upon arrival, they wouldn’t have had to leave the station to find a  streetcar to take them to the area of town by St. Paul’s church.

Busy Main Street in Worcester, Massachusetts, 1910.

Streetcar workers in New York City.

But the Judge’s wife Ruth refused to let little Erskine go because she believed it was wrong to ride the cars on the Sabbath.

“My darling, don’t you remember mamma told you how the poor men who have to make the cars go, cannot have any Sunday—any time to go to church, and read the Bible, and learn about God and heaven?”

Streetcar workers in Albany, NY.

“I know, mamma; but the cars go all the same, and the men have to work, and so why can’t we ride on them? They wouldn’t have to work any harder because we went along.”

In Ruth Erskine’s Son, the street-cars stopped at the corner of the Burnham’s residential street, where widowed Ruth Burnham lived with her son and his wife. Now an adult, Erskine Burnham took the 8:00 a.m. car to his office downtown each morning just “as surely as the sun was to rise”; and every evening he returned home by streetcar to his wife and his mother.

“I don’t suppose you two can fully appreciate what it is to me to get home to you after a stuffy, snarly day in town. I sit in the car sometimes with closed eyes after a day of turmoil to picture how it will all look. But the reality always exceeds my imagination.”

A streetcar running down a residential street in Bristol, Rhode Island.

In the evenings, his doting mother, Ruth, was able to watch for Erskine’s return from her bedroom window.

She leaned forward, presently, and watched Erskine’s car stop at the corner, and watched his springing step as he came with glad haste to his home.

In the majority of her books, Isabella Alden’s characters rode on the cars to get to work, to escape the city for a country idyll, or simply to run errands around town. But riding the cars was a little different for women than it was for men. Watch for a future post, Ladies Riding Cars, that will explore one of the unique challenges women faced while traveling on public transportation.

 

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6 Responses to “Riding the Cars”

  1. Vicky Benson August 14, 2014 at 9:00 am #

    I love your posts about the history of the time and certainly want to share this! In the second paragraph, did you mean to say “late 1800s” rather than the “late 1900’s”? Hopefully, that can be fixed without too much trouble. 😊

  2. rperkins100 August 14, 2014 at 10:18 am #

    I enjoy reading all your posts. If I stopped during reading the books to look up everything I don’t know, I would never get through it. This was very fascinating about the streetcars and answered a lot of questions I had. Just one little correction, you mean 1800s in the second paragraph.

    Sent from my iPhone ~Becky

    >

    • Isabella Alden August 16, 2014 at 5:46 am #

      I love reading Isabella Alden’s books but I also stumble a little when I come across terms or phrases in her books that don’t make sense today. Thanks for your feedback! I made the correction you caught so paragraph 2 now references the right century.

  3. whitequeen54 August 14, 2014 at 12:21 pm #

    The first time I saw the phrase “ride the cars” was in Understood Betsy, when Betsy and her friend were stranded at a fair and someone told them they could ride the cars home. I assumed it was a train. Then when I started reading Grace Livingston Hill books I realized there was a whole network of streetcars (apparently all over the East Coast) and found that absolutely amazing!

    • Isabella Alden August 16, 2014 at 6:06 am #

      I’m so glad you mentioned Understood Betsy. When I was young I had a copy on my bookshelf right next to Little Women and An Old-Fashioned Girl. Since I was raised a city-girl myself, the description of Elizabeth’s adjustment to farm life was fascinating to me. My old copy of the book is long-gone but I’m sure I can find another. Thanks for the tip!

      • whitequeen54 August 16, 2014 at 10:13 am #

        It’s available at Project Gutenberg, fortunately, because my old copy is long-gone too.

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The Hall in the Grove

Author of Classic Christian Fiction

Isabella Alden

Author of Classic Christian Fiction

Author Jenny Berlin

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