Inside Pansy’s Classroom

12 Sep

Isabella Alden taught Sunday school for decades. It was one of her favorite things to do, and she was widely considered to be an expert in the field of teaching very young children about the Bible.

A chapter heading from the book “How to Teach the Little Folks” by J. Bennet Tyler, 1875.

Her favorite age-group to teach was what she called the “infant class”—children who were not yet old enough to read, or were just beginning to read.

She wrote many articles and regularly conducted classes on how to teach children about the Bible and God’s promise of salvation through Christ.

From the book “Chautauqua: Historical and Descriptive,” 1884.

She once said:

“My ideal Sunday school classroom is bright, well ventilated, curtained, carpeted, with low, easy seats, flowers on the desk and in the windows, ornamental pictures on the walls, a good sized portable revolving blackboard in a central position, maps and charts and diagrams, and whatever else will help to illustrate Bible truths gathered into that pleasant spot.”

While that may have been her ideal Sunday school classroom, the truth was that Isabella often taught her little students over the vestibule of a dingy old church. Instead of ornamental pictures on the walls, more often than not she had to use pictures cut out of a Bible dictionary to help illustrate her lesson, and a broken slate for a blackboard.

But Isabella did not suffer those situations for very long. She knew how to brighten a dingy spot and make it attractive:

“Home pictures and flowers are cheap, and tact and patience can transform any sort of a place into something like beauty. I always have the best room I can get, and make it as attractive as possible.”

Once Isabella had the physical location of her Sunday school under control, she was free to concentrate on teaching her little ones.

The Kindergarten Class, by Max Lieberman, 1880.

When she was just starting out, she once had a class that began very badly. The wee ones were afraid to even whisper, and she could not coax them to repeat their verses no matter how hard she tried. When she tried to talk to each little scholar individually, they were so frightened, they began to cry. Clearly, there was no point in trying to coax them into singing a little hymn. So what did Isabella do?

Late for School, by Julius Johann Ferdinand Kronberg, 1872.

The next week she brought with her half a dozen little girls from her regular schoolroom where she was teaching during the week.

“These little ones were good readers, some of them, but with pretty childlike ways. They knew their lessons and were not afraid to say so, and they sang like birds. The consequence was that my timid ones soon caught their spirit, and my class of infants which bade fair to be a dismal failure became a success.”

What do you imagine it was like to be in Isabella’s Sunday-school class? She gave us some hints in one of the articles she wrote about teaching. Here’s the agenda she typically followed:

Roll call
Prayer
Collection
Singing
Five minutes talk about the hymn just sung
Distribution of cards for next Sabbath’s lesson
Reading those cards in concert
Singing
Distribution of papers
Recitation of verses

She liked to keep the opening prayer brief; just a few simple sentences which she had the children repeat after her. Then they would close with the Lord’s Prayer in concert.

The Sunday School, by Robert McInnes

If any of the children remembered to bring their pennies for the collection, Isabella taught them to repeat this little verse as they deposited them in the plate:

Small are the offerings we can make,
But thou hast taught us, Lord,
If given for the Savior’s sake,
They lose not their reward.

Since the majority of her students were too young to read, Isabella found ways to teach them Bible verses and poems to illustrate a short lesson. One of her favorites was a poem that many children still learn today:

Two little eyes to look to God,
Two little ears to hear his Word,
Two little feet to walk in his ways,
Two little lips to sing his praise,
Two little hands to do his will,
And one little heart to love him still.

And she taught them to “point to the different portions of their body indicated by the words they speak.”

She always selected a verse for the children to memorize. She read the verse with her students aloud and reread it until the bright ones could repeat it from memory; then she talked about the verse with her class, and stressed the importance of reciting the verse correctly. The following week, she used that verse as the foundation for her lesson.

“I like to cluster my talk [around] one personal practical thought that will make clear the fact that the story is for each little boy and girl who hears it. “

Her “talk” was, in reality, a story. She used illustrations from little ones’ home, school and playground experiences to build a relatable story. Then, when she reached the point of the story when the lesson was to be revealed, she let her class bring in the verse they had learned the week before.

“The delight which little children feel in discovering that what they have learned fits in with what their teacher is telling them a story about, can only be appreciated by those who see it.”

The school Walk by Albert Anker, 1872.

When it was time to close the lesson it was her preference that no books or pictures should be distributed.

“No outside matter should be allowed to come in between the pupils and the impression earnestly sought to be made.”

She did not even like to close with singing unless she found a hymn that had a clear connection with the lesson.

“I like better to close with a very brief prayer woven out of the words of the golden text, and so send the little ones away with a sweet and clear impression of the Bible lesson of the day.”

Isabella used the same method in crafting her stories for young people and adults. She chose a Bible verse and a lesson or theme she wanted to communicate about a specific verse, and wove a story around it. It was a process that served her well for the one-hundred-plus novels she wrote in her lifetime!


This post is part of our Blogiversary Celebration! Leave a comment below or on Isabella’s Facebook page to be entered in a drawing for a $25 Amazon gift card! We’ll announce the winner on Friday, September 14!

20 Responses to “Inside Pansy’s Classroom”

  1. Angie Thompson September 12, 2018 at 4:49 am #

    Very interesting! I didn’t know she was a Sunday school teacher, but thinking over some of the scenes in her books, it makes a lot of sense. 🙂 The Sunday school scene in “Links in Rebecca’s Life” always struck me as particularly realistic–although not with the kind of teacher example anyone should want to follow…

    • Isabella Alden September 12, 2018 at 10:01 am #

      I always wondered if Isabella wrote some of those scenes based on real-life examples she saw. Thanks for commenting, Angie! —Jenny

  2. Ryana Lynn Miller September 12, 2018 at 6:01 am #

    I’m bookmarking this post! I write novels in this time period and my mind is buzzing with possibilities!

  3. Karen Noske September 12, 2018 at 6:09 am #

    Cannot even tell you what a blessing this post is!! THANK YOU! I’m going to implement her brilliant, Spirit-inspired routine with my elderly students as I know it will work for them just as wonderfully as it worked for her. Oh, thank you!!! Love in Christ, Karen

    • Isabella Alden September 12, 2018 at 10:02 am #

      Thanks so much for suggesting this topic, Karen! —Jenny

  4. kristin September 12, 2018 at 6:36 am #

    One thing I regret is that I never attended the Sunday school class that my paternal grandmother taught. I attended Sunday school, which for little children was held during church,not very long. I went to church instead. Years later I remember driving up to church with my father, who was the minister, and my grandmother was already there because she had been teaching Sunday school. I never even thought about going. Sigh.

  5. Rebekah A. Morris September 12, 2018 at 6:41 am #

    I would have wanted to be in her Sunday School class! I like the thought of actually making the Bible relatable to the children’s everyday life not just Bible stories of what once happened.

    • Isabella Alden September 12, 2018 at 10:07 am #

      I agree, Rebekah! I think Isabella’s methods were rather innovative for the time. Maybe that’s why she was so in demand as a teacher and lecturer on the topic of teaching young people. —Jenny

  6. Diane September 12, 2018 at 7:18 am #

    So encouraging!! My husband and I work with the same age everyday and were excited to see we use many of the same methods and learned more from this post!! Thanks so much for sharing!!

  7. Ashley September 12, 2018 at 8:40 am #

    I help with the children in my church as well and I greatly appreciate Isabella’s approach. Pointing the children to Christ and the inspired Word of God was evidently important to her and is important to us as well. I’d never heard the “two little eyes..” poem and want to remember that. Thank you for this post!

    • Isabella Alden September 12, 2018 at 10:24 am #

      You’re welcome, Ashley. If you’d like to learn the simple tune for the “two little eyes” poem, here’s a sweet little video you can watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Itr3aIn8N70

      • Ashley September 13, 2018 at 7:06 am #

        Oh wonderful! I find tunes very helpful for memorizing poems and Scripture and I find it helps the children too. Thank you so much!

  8. Patricia Stendal September 12, 2018 at 10:06 am #

    Excellent! I hope we still have teachers like that today.

  9. Debby Bishop September 12, 2018 at 10:49 am #

    I taught primary Sunday School for many years and can see how these God inspired ways would go far in reaching little ones. Mrs. Alden was definitely Spirit-filled and lead..I wish I could have personally known her. Thank you for these many posts and blogs.

    • Isabella Alden September 12, 2018 at 11:19 am #

      I would love to have known her, too, Debby! Thanks for sharing your thoughts. Jenny

  10. seijalaine September 13, 2018 at 9:24 pm #

    She definitely used her experiences teaching Sunday school when writing books with Sunday school scenes. One of the most vivid was the scene in “Four Chatauqua Girls at Home”, when the 4 principal characters attend Sunday school for the first time after coming back home. I love that series especially.

    • Isabella Alden September 14, 2018 at 5:00 am #

      The Chautauqua Girls series is one of her best! —Jenny

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Writer Jenny Berlin

Faith, romance, and a place to belong

The Hall in the Grove

Author of Classic Christian Fiction

Isabella Alden

Author of Classic Christian Fiction

Britt Reads Fiction

Reviews and giveaways for Christian fiction and sweet, clean fiction. Bringing readers information on great stories and connecting authors with their readers.

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